2013 Caldecott Winner:


When a tiny fish shoots into view wearing a round blue topper (which happens to fit him perfectly), trouble “could” be following close behind. So it’s a good thing that enormous fish won’t wake up. And even if he does, it’s not like he’ll ever know what happened. . . . Visual humor swims to the fore as the best-selling Jon Klassen follows his breakout debut with another deadpan-funny tale.

2013 Newbery Winner:

Ivan is an easygoing gorilla. Living at the Exit 8 Big Top Mall and Video Arcade, he has grown accustomed to humans watching him through the glass walls of his domain. He rarely misses his life in the jungle. In fact, he hardly ever thinks about it at all.

Instead, Ivan thinks about TV shows he’s seen and about his friends Stella, an elderly elephant, and Bob, a stray dog. But mostly Ivan thinks about art and how to capture the taste of a mango or the sound of leaves with color and a well-placed line.

Then he meets Ruby, a baby elephant taken from her family, and she makes Ivan see their home–and his own art–through new eyes. When Ruby arrives, change comes with her, and it’s up to Ivan to make it a change for the better.

Katherine Applegate blends humor and poignancy to create Ivan’s unforgettable first-person narration in a story of friendship, art, and hope.

2013 Printz Winner:

“Shorty” is a Haitian boy trapped in the ruins of a hospital when the earth explodes around him. Surrounded by lifeless bodies and growing desperately weak from lack of food and water, death seems imminent. Yet as Shorty waits in darkness for a rescue that may never come, he becomes aware of another presence, one reaching out to him across two hundred years of history. It is the presence of slave and revolutionary leader Toussaint L’Ouverture, whose life was marred by violence, and whose own end came in darkness. What unites a child of the slums with the man who would shake a troubled country out of slavery? Is it the darkness they share . . . or is it hope?
Raw, harrowing, and peopled with vibrant characters, “In Darkness” is an extraordinary book about the cruelties of man and nature, and the valiant, ongoing struggle for a country’s very survival.

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award recognizing an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults:        “Hand in Hand: Ten Black Men Who Changed America,” written by Andrea Davis Pinkney and illustrated by Brian Pinkney is the King Author Book winner.

Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award:

“I, Too, Am America,” illustrated by Bryan Collier , is the King Illustrator Book winner. The book is written by Langston Hughes.

Schneider Family Book Award for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience:

“Back to Front and Upside Down!” written and illustrated by Claire Alexander wins the award for children ages 0 to 10.

“A Dog Called Homeless” written by Sarah Lean is the winner of the middle-school (ages 11-13) award.

The teen (ages 13-18) award winner is “Somebody, Please Tell Me Who I Am,” written by Harry Mazer and Peter Lerangis.

Mildred L. Batchelder Award for an outstanding children’s book originally published in a language other than English in a country other than the United States and subsequently translated into English for publication in the United States: “My Family for the War” is the 2013 Batchelder Award winner. Originally published in Germany in 2007 as “Liverpool Street,” the book was written by Anne C. Voorhoeve , translated by Tammi Reichel.

Pura Belpre (Illustrator) Award honoring a Latino writer and illustrator whose children’s books best portray, affirm and celebrate the Latino cultural experience: ” Martin de Porres : The Rose in the Desert,” illustrated by David Diaz , is the Belpre Illustrator Award winner

Pura Belpre (Author) Award: “Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe,” written by Benjamin Alire Saenz

Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award for most distinguished informational book for children:

“Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon,” written by Steve Sheinkin

Stonewall Book Award given annually to English-language children’s and young adult books of exceptional merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experience: “Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe,” written by Benjamin Alire Saenz

Theodor Seuss Geisel Award for the most distinguished beginning reader book: “Up, Tall and High!” written and illustrated by Ethan Long

William C. Morris Award for a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens: “Seraphina,” written by Rachel Hartman

YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction:  “Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon,” written by Steve Sheinkin

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